Jeff Clarke Ecology

My Blog - Jeff Clarke

Updates and photos from around the world on my travels both through pleasure and work

  • Home
    Home This is where you can find all the blog posts throughout the site.
  • Categories
    Categories Displays a list of categories from this blog.
  • Tags
    Tags Displays a list of tags that have been used in the blog.
  • Archives
    Archives Contains a list of blog posts that were created previously.

Posted by on in My Blog
All images taken on the 2016 tour and copyright Jeff Clarke 2016 (click on images to enlarge to full size) As a wildlife tour leader I get to visit some really great locations and enjoy the fabulous natural wildlife spectacles they have to offer. I was particularly looking forward to this tour as it would include some whale and dolphin watching off the coast of La Gomera. Teresa Farino (far right) with part of the tour party in the 'badlands' For this tour I was co-leading with one of my regular partners, Teresa Farino of Iberian Wildlife Tours a fabulous naturalist and preparer of incredibly lavish lunches. We convened at Tenerife South Airport as a party of 14 and we soon arrived at our first stop; the badlands of Los Galle...
Continue reading Last modified on
Hits: 2851 Comments
Rate this blog entry:
1

Posted by on in My Blog
b2ap3_thumbnail_Caerlaverock-800-270216.jpg
At the end of February, I took my Birdcraft group to one of my favourite parts of the UK to enjoy the ornithological delights of Dumfries and Galloway. It’s the perfect destination for an avid gooseoholic and where better to begin than the flatlands of WWT Caerlaverock.  I was aided and abetted by two birding buddies in the shape of Messer’s Anthony (Anno) Brandreth and Paul Hill. We overnighted at the Caerlaverock farmhouse, which gave us the opportunity to enjoy the nocturnal Badger activity, before spending the day admiring the fine selection of wildfowl and waders wintering on the site. Whooper Pond view from the Scott Observatory In late winter Caerlaverock is home to large numbers of Whooper Swans. As always it was gre...
Continue reading Last modified on
Hits: 1306 Comments
Rate this blog entry:
0

Posted by on in My Blog
b2ap3_thumbnail_Takahe-Zealandia-Dec-2015-JJC.jpg
All images © Jeff Clarke 2016 unless otherwise stated ‘The Land of Birds’ adrift from Gondwana for 65 million years was utterly unique. No land mammals, except for bats, were to be found on this micro-continent. As a result the birds that arrived to populate it were able to diversify into many forms and occupy many of the niches that the mammals would otherwise exploit. A number of species became flightless and some like the Moa became giants. Moa The above image is from New Zealand Birds Online a great resource for visiting birders. The Maori arrived from Polynesia sometime after 1250 and from that moment the extinction crisis began. In less than 100 years the Moa were exterminated, eaten by the Maori, though rumours p...
©Jeff Clarke & NZBirds Online
Continue reading Last modified on
Hits: 3957 Comments
Rate this blog entry:
0

Posted by on in My Blog
The thing about New Zealand is that it’s a lot bigger than you think it is and it also takes longer to get to places than you expect. In 2012 we had to give up on the idea of getting to Stewart Island/Rakiura but this time we rectified the omission by scheduling a three day visit. To get there you cross the Foveaux Strait from Bluff by ferry (or small plane). Just before we boarded I jokingly mentioned to my Wife and friends that it was usually referred to as the ‘Notorious’ Foveaux Strait. They had the last laugh as I was the one who succumbed to seasickness on the one-hour rollercoaster crossing. I noted a few White-capped Albatrosses trailing in our wake, but the swell and the spray made birding untenable. We stayed at the lovely...
Continue reading Last modified on
Hits: 2742 Comments
Rate this blog entry:
0

Posted by on in My Blog
During my recent tour of New Zealand I had been particularly keen to see New Zealand Falcons, partly because I love birds of prey, but also because I’d failed to connect on my previous visit. Almost half way through our three-week tour we reached Wanaka and we still had not found a falcon. We called at the local D.O.C. tourist office and they suggested a location where there had been recent sightings so, that evening, we set out to a locality near the Hawea River. Our instructions involved a 3km walk out to a site from the local campground. My mate Ian had a foot injury so we gave him a stick to bite on as we toiled toward our suggested location. 2 Hours and 6km later, in failing light, we had singularly failed to find any falcons and I...
©Jeff Clarke and Ian Appleton
Continue reading Last modified on
Hits: 1304 Comments
Rate this blog entry:
0

Connect

Subscribe to My Blog

Your Name:
Your Email: